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Social Media For Small Business: How do I use social media as a digital shopfront?

May 21, 2019 / 3 min

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Social Media For Small Business: How do I use social media as a digital shopfront?

May 21, 2019 / 3 min

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Social media has a lot more selling power than you might think. We spoke with Jake Camacho, Regional Growth Manager at Locowise, about how to convert your social media followers into paying customers.

“Globally, the average person spends over two hours per day on social media and this number is only rising year-on-year,” he says.

“You should always focus your marketing on where you think your audience will be, and increasingly that place is social media.”

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Convert sales using your social channels

If you’re looking to set up a digital shopfront for your customers to use, there’s plenty of functionality built into popular social media channels like Facebook and Instagram you can take advantage of.

“Instagram is the preferred social channel for many e-commerce vendors, and is a relatively straightforward way for a small business to get started with social media right away,” says Camacho.

“The visual format really lends itself to showing off products, and Instagram users have a higher propensity to spend.”

Instagram recently implemented a new “Checkout” feature, too, which allows users to buy directly from within the app. Tagging products in your posts means you can convert eye-catching content into direct sales, and your Instagram account can be implemented into the popular Shopify sales platform.

“And if your brand has cracked the 10,000 followers mark, you can use the “Swipe Up” feature in ‘Stories’ to link people directly to your webstore pages,” says Camacho.

You should always focus your marketing on where you think your audience will be, and increasingly that place is social media.

Facebook carousel posts can also be used to send customers directly to products on an existing online store, or you can add a shopfront to your Facebook page and list products there.

Log in to Facebook and select the “Shop” tab to get started. Once it’s set up, your shopfront will appear on your Facebook page for customers to see after you add at least one product, and it is approved by moderators.

Products from your shop may appear in Facebook’s “Marketplace” too. You can also use a Facebook shop to host products for users shopping on Instagram, too. If you’re keen to get started, visit Facebook’s Business Help Centre to learn more.

Turn loyal customers into brand ambassadors

You can turn customers into advocates by sharing social media content that they post – this is called user-generated content.

“Today’s consumers are keenly aware of authenticity and, in general, content that’s shared by other users is seen as more authentic than content by brands,” says Camacho.

“Plus creating content is time and resource intensive, so showcasing content that your customers create is a no-brainer. Platforms like Foursixty allow you to create user-generated content galleries directly on your webpage, complete with shopping links.”

This will be easier to find if you establish a unique hashtag that your customers can use when tagging your products or small business. Keep it short and sweet – under 11 characters is the ideal hashtag length – and choose something that you can use long term and in a variety of situations.

So what does Camacho see for the future of social media for small business shopfronts?

“An overarching trend that will shape the future of digital marketing and e-commerce is the shift from desktop to mobile, and the e-commerce space will have to adjust,” he says.

“More and more businesses will move towards creating mobile-first experiences, with landing pages and simplified user journeys optimised for mobile.”

This is the fifth and final part of our Social Media For Small Business series. Missed the previous four parts? Catch up now:



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